Postcards from The Widow of Wall Street

 

“When Phoebe and Jake Pierce meet as teenagers, she knows he’s someone on the way up, and she wants to be there as he climbs the Wall Street ladder. He gets everything he ever wanted. When it turns out that Jake’s success rests on a huge Ponzi scheme, Phoebe has to make an excruciating choice.
New York Post ‘Must Read Books’

“ . . .as this compelling story unfolds, you realize nothing is as uncomplicated as it seems.”
Associated Press

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Another Storied Recipe: Mystery Novel Chocolate Pie Supreme

 About a million years ago I read (a now out of date) mystery, Gastronomic Murder, by Alexandra Roudybush (look for this book. I got a second-hand copy recently. Try the library. That’s where I got in back in the day. At that time, I couldn’t afford to buy books and the local Boston library was my savior.

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Armchair Adventuring: Stories of Survival

Stories of survival fill me with shivery delight. I rarely meet a story of man/woman/elements that doesn’t keep me up till all hours—it’s no doubt one of my favorite sub-genres. Below are two recent entries into my hall of fame, along with an evergreen selection.

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How Readers Discover Books

This is going to be one long post! I tried to organize the answers to my survey, “How Do You Discover Books” in a way that will be most useful, but, wow! I was overwhelmed, not by the number of people who responded to the survey—that was a respectable 213—but by organizing and reading the over 110 comments. The devil really is in these details.

First: This was an unscientific venture. I sent it to a mailing list of book clubs, writers and friends. I wrote a post with a link to the survey (that was open to the world) and asked friends to share that post, which I and others put on FB and Twitter—so most certainly this swayed the answers. But those who answered were, like me, readers to the core.

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The Before and After of Author (All?) Photos

 

If you love every picture of yourself, or you’re one of those naturally photogenic people, you won’t need this post. And I probably don’t want to stand next to you in any photo.

For the rest of us, there are tricks to make ourselves look less double-chinned, squint-eyed, or serial killerish in photos. I know. I am decidedly not one of those naturally photogenic people. Thus, my gathering of every bit of advice I could find before having an author photo taken. (Now I want to figure out how to outlaw people from ‘tagging’ me in candid shots they’ve taken. Isn’t there something about souls being stolen?)

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Favorite Reads of August 2017

Reading. What is it good for?
Absolutely everything.
And I just can’t live without it.
I don’t think I’ve ever fallen asleep without a book in my hand since I learned my letters as a child.

My top reads this month:

The Heirs by Susan Rieger

I fell into The Heirs as though someone had made my bed up with the crispest of sheets, placed down pillows of the most perfect loft at my head and handed me a plate of divine chocolate and cheese. As written on the publishers site, yes, this “is a tale out of Edith Wharton for the twentieth century.”  “Fans of Salinger’s stories about Manhattan’s elite will enjoy this novel about privileged siblings who grapple with the state of their inheritance and long-held secrets that emerge in the wake of their father’s death.” — InStyle

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Reads (and Listens) for July 2018

“A capacity, and taste, for reading gives access to whatever has already been discovered by others. ” Abraham Lincoln

Reading keeps me sane. Highlighted here are some recent reads, some not-so-recent, but all ones that made an indelible impression on my heart and mind.

The One Man


The One Man kept my up long past midnight, pushed  my heart into my throat—Andrew Gross made real every cliche used in book blurbs. Yes. I could not put it down.

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Top 10 Reasons to Come to Belmont Books on June 28 (Wed!)

  1. Belmont Books is a dream come alive for my wonderful friends, Kathy Crowley & Chris Abouzeid—writers, dreamers, community-minded people, big-hearted, ridiculously funny (Chris) & ridiculously motherly (Kathy). Celebrate with us as we toast them.

 

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  1. Ellen Meeropol’s new novel, Kinship of Clover, was chosen as an NPR small press ‘best.’ Charles Baxter, author of The Feast of Love wrote “Midway through this wonderful novel, you will find a woman dancing in her wheelchair. That scene is one of many memorable moments in a story about young people organizing for a sustainable future, even as their once-radical elders try to hold on to a gradually disappearing past. This is a book about time and love, politics and family, and it is sharply observant and deeply compassionate.”
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My Recommended Reads (and Listens) for June

 

Reading is my life blood—between pleasure reading and research, I usually have three or four books going at a time. Including, of course, an audio book for when I’m driving, cleaning, or folding laundry. This month, the books that kept me awake were:

For depth and dignity: HUNGER by Roxane Gay. I can’t get enough time to inhale this book as fast as I want; which may be good, as this book requires thought (though it’s clear as water to read.) Totally up to the hype and more.

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The Amazing Jewish Book Fair Ride

 Don’t forget; Jewish people read an enormous amount,” my lovely (and Jewish) literary agent said before my book launch. “We really love books.”

I nodded. Yes, I knew that—at least I knew it inasmuch as I was Jewish and I read—as did my mother, my sister, and my daughters, but could I raise that sample to the status of landslide? Discerning what was true in my culture was fraught with difficulty. I grew up with a slight case of anomie, surrounded by a cultural belief that all-things-Jewish=equals families-pushing-one-towards-great-achievement, while, among other family oddities, my grandmother taught me to shoplift.

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